Guide Images

For each step in your guide, you'll add both written instructions and photos demonstrating those instructions. Let's go over photos first.

preparing and uploading your pictures

Before adding pictures to your guide, you can use Photoshop or other software to lighten up or crop them so that they look better. However, we have a few guidelines:

  • Please do NOT use Photoshop to remove photo backgrounds. Your backgrounds don’t have to be perfectly white; a nice uncluttered background is less distracting than one that has been crudely cut out. Even if you really, really know what you’re doing, your time is better spent on other parts of the project.

  • Please do NOT use Photoshop to add markup to pictures. Instead, use iFixit's built-in markup tool. This way, anyone can change the markup in case a mistake is made, whereas Photoshopped markup is permanently attached to the picture.

  • Take the picture with the device against a solid white background that is well-lit, with the camera in landscape orientation.

  • Keep your pictures as large as possible in terms of resolution. If a picture is 4000 x 3000 pixels in size, so be it!

  • To upload a photo, add/edit a step and click the camera icon. This brings up your personal media manager, where you can manage your existing photos and upload new ones.

CroppING YOUR PICTURES

You should crop each photo so that it:

To crop a photo, go to the step editor and click on the gear icon in the upper right corner of the image. Select “Crop."

crop_instruction.jpg

In the new window that opens, click and drag the corners of the selection box to frame your photo. Once you have your photo in position, click Save.

 

Markup

Once your photos are in place, you can use iFixit’s markup system to highlight the location of screws and other key components when necessary.

  • To add markup to an image, first click the gear icon on the image thumbnail, and then click “Markers…”

  • Start off each step with red markup. Use additional colors only if there are more items that need to be marked up in the same step. Use them in the order they appear (red, then orange, then yellow, etc.). (Exception: If you’re marking up a red object—or any other color that doesn’t provide good visibility—feel free to skip to a color with better contrast.)

  • Use circles for screws, and squares for other things (connectors, clips, etc.).

  • Don't add lines, arrows, or brackets. The markup editor can create lines, arrows, and brackets, but you should not use them for this project.

  • Don’t overuse markup. Only add markup where it is necessary to point something out that is not otherwise obvious in the image. In many cases, a well-composed photograph that is centered on the action won’t need any markup at all.

  • Here is an iPhone 5 guide that shows proper use of markup.

 

LEGO_9_edited.jpg

There's no lifeguard on duty.

You don’t want to end up back in the kiddie pool with floaties. Pay careful attention so that your photos don’t have tan lines (improper exposure), sunburns (color cast), or photobombers (messy backgrounds). You’ll save time (and hopefully not have to reshoot) by making sure that your photos are picture-perfect and up to the standards listed on the Unit 2 instructions and checklist. When you’re ready, throw us a line at techwriting[at]ifixit[dot]com, and we’ll let you know when you can boogie board into Unit 3.